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Workshops

Faculty

If you have questions about integrating writing assignments into your class or planning a writing-intensive course, please contact the Director. Unless otherwise noted, workshops are presented by Dr. Jim Purdy.

Designing Effective Writing Projects

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00-1:30 p.m., 613 Union

Have students ever been confused by a writing assignment you thought was clear? Have you ever received from students responses to a writing assignment that did not match what you thought you assigned or what you expected? Good assignment design helps you lessen student confusion and receive the writing projects you intend. This workshop will provide participants with tips for creating clear, productive writing assignments. Faculty and graduate students will learn instructional verbs to use when assigning particular writing tasks, design suggestions for chunking information for today's students, and approaches to scaffolding/breaking down projects. Participants are welcome to bring drafts of assignments to workshop. If you assign writing tasks in your course, whether it is a University-designated "W" course or not, this workshop is for you!

To register, please visit http://www.duq.edu/about/centers-and-institutes/center-for-teaching-excellence/events/workshops.

Planning a Writing-Intensive Course

Thursday, November 6, 2014, 12:15-1:30 p.m., 109 Union

One of the biggest challenges of teaching a writing-intensive course is incorporating the writing assignments/projects into the syllabus. When should due dates fall? How can the syllabus reflect the scaffolding of activities the lead to a writing project? How can writing activities fit in with all the content to be covered? This hands-on workshop will guide participants in planning the syllabus for a Spring 2014 writing-intensive course. Faculty and graduate students will leave with an outline of the schedule of writing projects and tasks. If you teach a University-designated "W" course, you will find this workshop especially useful as you prepare your new syllabus.

To register, please visit http://www.duq.edu/about/centers-and-institutes/center-for-teaching-excellence/events/workshops.


Students

The National Day on Writing, October 20-24, 2014

The Writing Center will be celebrating the National Day on Writing, October 20, 2014, with two events:

Collaborative Brainstorming Session
Want to get a head start on that next writing project or final term paper? Not sure where to begin? Looking for advice?

Participate in the Writing Center's Collaborative Brainstorming Session. Between 12-4 p.m. on Monday, October 20, a consultant will be available in 216 College Hall to help you with strategies for getting started and organizing your ideas. Take advantage of the Writing Center's resources and workspace. There will be note cards, a cork board, pushpins, post-its, markers, a dry erase board, textbooks, style manuals, handouts, and a designated writing consultant ready to help. No appointments are necessary, and there will be candy for you to enjoy while you work!

Scavenger Hunt
Participate in the Writing Center's scavenger hunt! Stop by the Writing Center (216 College Hall) to pick up your activity sheet. Correct answer sheets will be entered into a drawing for gift cards to Barnes & Noble and Starbucks! Candy will be available in the Writing Center for all participants! Please return your completed scavenger hunt form to the Writing Center by 3 p.m., Friday, October 24 to be entered into the drawing for prizes.

Like us on Facebook for updates on this and other activities.


Example Workshops from 2009-2014

Faculty

Grading Writing to Encourage Revision

Thursday, February 27, 12:15-1:30 p.m.,
608 Union

Wednesday November 20, 2013, 12:00-1:00 p.m. -- RESCHEDULED to Spring 2014
SLPA Webinar

This workshop will provide strategies for grading writing to encourage students to revise. The session will address tips for using comments to teach students rather than to justify a grade. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn about giving comments a future orientation, using minimal marking, and asking students to respond to comments. Taken together, these approaches offer ways to help students take responsibility for their learning.

Five Writing Activities for Any Day

Tuesday, October 22, 2013, 1:45-3:00 p.m.
108 Canevin

Knowing what writing activities to use in class can be a challenge both pedagogically and logistically. What will help students most effectively learn material? What can serve as a productive task for the last ten minutes of class? Operating from the premise that writing facilitates learning, this workshop will describe five in-class writing activities and associated learning goals that new and experienced teachers can incorporate into classes from any discipline or level. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for writing tasks that they can implement in the classroom. They are also welcome to bring their own ideas to share.

Plagiarism Resistant Assignments and Tools for Promoting Academic Integrity
Presenters: James Purdy (Writing Center and English) and Dana Oliver (Educational Technology)

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, 12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
613 Union

In the copy and paste culture of today's students, plagiarism is a recurring problem for higher education. However, faculty can minimize the risk of plagiarism through the design of their assignments and the strategic use of SafeAssign to help students monitor their use of sources. In this workshop, faculty will learn strategies to create research and writing assignments that are resistant to plagiarism. They will also learn about the Blackboard's SafeAssign tool as a way to encourage academic integrity among their students.

Planning a Writing-Intensive Course

Thursday, April 10, 12:15-1:30 p.m..
608 Union

Tuesday, December 3, 2013, 1:45-3:00 p.m.
108 Canevin

Thursday, April 11, 2013, 12:15 - 1:30 p.m.
613 Union

Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 11:00-12:00 p.m.
643 College Hall

Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 1:00-2:00 p.m.
643 College Hall

One of the biggest challenges of teaching a writing-intensive course is incorporating the writing assignments/projects into the syllabus. When should due dates fall? How can the syllabus reflect the scaffolding of activities the lead to a writing project? How can writing activities fit in with all the content to be covered? This hands-on workshop will guide participants in planning the syllabus for a writing-intensive course. Faculty and graduate students will leave with an outline of the schedule of writing projects and tasks.This workshop will be especially useful for instructors teaching "W" classes

(How) Should We Teach Grammar?: Strategies for Responding to Sentence-Level Writing Mistakes

Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell Hall

Concern and frustration over students' grammar errors seem to be ever-present-and recurring-elements of teaching and grading writing. What is an instructor to do? This workshop, co-sponsored by the University Writing Center and CTE, will briefly point to some scholarship that provides useful frameworks to help understand students' sentence-level writing errors. Then it will offer techniques for responding to these mistakes that promote student learning over teacher editing. Faculty and graduate students will learn strategies they can apply to their classroom instruction and writing feedback.

Five Writing Activities for Any Day

Tuesday, September 20, 2012, 1:45-3:00 p.m.
119 Union

Knowing what writing activities to use in class can be a challenge both pedagogically and logistically. What will help students most effectively learn material? What can serve as a productive task for the last ten minutes of class? Operating from the premise that writing facilitates learning, this workshop will describe five in-class writing activities and associated learning goals that new and experienced teachers can incorporate into classes from any discipline or level. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for writing tasks that they can implement in the classroom. They are also welcome to bring their own ideas to share.

Strategies for Responding to Student Writing

Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
109 Union

Responding to student writing is sometimes one of the most overwhelming -and time consuming- aspects of teaching writing. This workshop, co-sponsored by CTE, will address methods for efficiently and effectively providing productive written feedback on student writing. Faculty and graduate students will learn ways to offer revision suggestions students are more likely to take and to guide students in assuming responsibility for their writing choices. They will also learn strategies for offering feedback without spending too much time on each paper.

Effective Approaches to Peer Writing Workshops

Tuesday, September 28, 2010, 1:45 - 3:00 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell

An increasingly common and effective way to promote process writing is to conduct peer workshops. Sometimes, however, teachers and students worry about the quality of the feedback students provide one another. This workshop will explain the benefits of peer workshops (despite the potential for imperfect feedback), reasons to use them, and ways to integrate them into courses. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn different models for peer workshopping activities and strategies to encourage productive student feedback and, ultimately, stronger writing.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

A Prezi from the workshop is available for viewing.

Perspectives on Preparing Undergraduates for Research and Publishing

Panelists:  Norm Conti (Sociology), Steve Hansen (CTE & OSL), Patrick Miller (Philosophy), Jim Purdy (English & Writing Center), Diana Sasso (Library), Sarah Woodley (Biological Sciences)
Monday, October 4, 2010, 1:45 - 3:00 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell

Many of Duquesne's undergraduates have the potential to present and publish their scholarship with advice and encouragement from faculty and the readily available research and writing support offered by Gumberg Library and the Writing Center. Panelists will offer strategies for guiding undergraduate students wishing to conduct research for publication and presentation.

Co-sponsored by Gumberg Library, Center for Teaching Excellence, and Office of Research

A handout from the workshop is available.

Wikipedia is Good for You!: Using Wikipedia to Teach Research-based Writing

Thursday, February 18, 2010, 3 - 4:15 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell Hall

A frequent top result of Google searches, Wikipedia is often used by students for research-based writing in college courses.  The problems of this approach are well-documented and have led some instructors to forbid its use.  This workshop will call for another approach by exploring ways to use Wikipedia to teach students productive composing practices.  Faculty and teaching assistants will learn about using components of the Wikipedia interface to model effective research-based scholarly writing, incorporating Wikipedia into research projects, and designing assignments that ask students to contribute to Wikipedia.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.


Students

Peer Review of CVs and Cover Letters

January 22, 2014, 1:00-2:30 p.m.
413B Canevin

Don't let your job application materials go to the bottom of the pile! Getting a second set of eyes on these important documents can only increase your chance of rising to the top. Graduate students are invited to bring CVs and cover letters to a peer review session facilitated by the Writing Center.

APA Source Use and Citation

Friday, January 10, 2014, 1:15-2:15 p.m.
102 Bayer

Thursday, October 3, 2013, 10:50-12:05 p.m. and 1:40-2:20 p.m.
553 Fisher Hall

Thursday, February 7, 2013, 10:50-12:05 p.m.
713 Fisher Hall

Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 10:45-11:45 a.m.
719 Fisher Hall

Wednesday, September 12, 2012, 9:00-9:45 a.m.
309 Canevin Hall

Wednesday, September 12, 2012, 10:00-10:45 a.m.
314 Canevin Hall

This presentation will review conventions of APA citation style for both in-text and references citations. Students will learn the rationale behind these guildelines. They will also see examples of the most common types of citations, learn options for integrating sources, and learn tips for avoiding common mistakes.

MLA Source Use and Citation

Wednesday, September 4, 2013, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
St. Martin Residence Hall Lounge

Thursday, January 17, 2013, 3:30-4:20 p.m. p.m.
423 College Hall

Wednesday, January 18, 2013, 8:00-8:50 a.m.
220 College Hall

This presentation will review conventions of MLA citation style for both in-text and references citations. Students will learn the rationale behind these guildelines. They will also see examples of the most common types of citations, learn options for integrating sources, and learn tips for avoiding common mistakes.

Structural and Sentence-Level Conventions of Scientific Research Papers

Friday, October 5, 2012, 4:00-5:00 p.m.
447 Mellon Hall

This presentation will address the IMRAD organizational structure for and two common types of writing in scientific research papers. It will also address sentence structure expectations and common sentence level errors in science writing.

Science Writing and Article Publication

Co-presented by Dr. Gerra Bosco
Thursday, December 1, 2011, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
643 College Hall

This workshop, targeted to students in the sciences, will cover overall strategies for submitting to an academic journal and review what authors can expect to happen when they submit an article for review. It will also contrast science writing characteristics with humanities writing characteristics, review conventional structure of science articles, and review sentence-level conventions of science writing.

Ten Tips for Integrating Outside Sources into College Writing

Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2-3 p.m.
715 Fisher

Much of the writing expected at the college level requires incorporating secondary source evidence. What does it mean to use secondary sources? What are ways to do so most effectively? After addressing reasons why students are asked to use outside sources, this workshop will explain ten practical tips for using outside sources successfully in college writing. Students will leave with strategies they can apply to research-based writing at any level.

A recording of the workshop is available.

Reviewing Fundamentals: Grammar Basics

Presented by Suzanne Cook
Monday, March 21, 2011, 2:00-3:00 p.m.
408 Gumberg Library
Monday, April 4, 2011, 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Nursing students)
541 Fisher Hall

In these days of texting, "tweeting," and firing off instant messages, we all have experience with the act of writing. However, these recent technological changes often disregard traditional conventions of grammar.  If you are stumped by subject-verb agreement or don't know what a dangling modifier is, this workshop is for you!  Students will review the basics of grammar and mechanics to refresh their knowledge of the different parts of speech and sentence-level concerns. Ultimately, this workshop will help students fine-tune their understandings of English grammar and improve their abilities to use English meaningfully and correctly.

A recorded version of the talk is available here.

Strategies for Writing Medical School Personal Statements

Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 10:00-10:45 a.m.
Wednesday, January 26, 2011, 10:00-10:50 a.m.
303 Rockwell

This workshop will cover strategies for writing personal statements for medical school. Students will learn what to do in a personal statement, techniques for brainstorming material to include, and tips for sentence-level clarity and correctness.

The Research Paper Paragraph

Wednesday, October 20, 2010, 2:00-3:15 p.m.
643 College Hall

Research projects can sometimes be overwhelming. One way to make writing them manageable is to focus on one paragraph at a time. This workshop will cover strategies for structuring ideas for and integrating sources into research paper paragraphs. Students will gain knowledge of how to use the "PEAS" method to organize paragraphs as well as when, why, and how to summarize, paraphrase, and quote sources. Students are welcome to bring specific questions.

Avoiding Plagiarism: Definitions and Strategies

Presented by Lee Ann Glowzenski
Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 2:00-3:30 p.m.
644 College Hall

This workshop will give students the opportunity to understand how the University defines plagiarism and to learn research and writing strategies to avoid it. The presentation will address academic integrity, note-taking and documentation practices, and MLA and APA citation styles. An activity will allow the group to think through solutions to common writing and citation problems.

Strategies for Successful Research-based Writing

Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
715 Fisher Hall

If you have questions about writing research projects or integrating and citing sources, this workshop is for you! This workshop will cover several strategies for successful research-based writing, including effective methods for integrating outside sources and determining when, why, and how to summarize, paraphrase, and quote. Students will gain knowledge of ways to manage research-based writing projects.

A webcast of the workshop is available here. Email writingcenter at duq.edu for the username and password.

Writing Your Résumé: Content, Structure, and Process

Co-presented by Lee Ann Glowsenski and Deb Saffer
Thursday, November 5, 2009 noon-1:00 p.m.
313 Canevin Hall

This workshop will offer strategies for writing an effective résumé.  The presentation will provide tips and techniques for generating ideas, structuring information, and writing to best showcase skills.  Students will leave with a better understanding of the processes involved in the task of writing an effective résumé.

Co-sponsored by Career Services.