A A Email Print Share

Duquesne University Students Honor Late Professor at ACS Symposium

A group of Duquesne University graduate chemistry students hosted a symposium at the American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting and Expo last week to honor their late professor, Dr. Jeffry Madura.

The symposium, "Frontiers in Computational Chemistry: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiment, A Symposium in Memory of Dr. Jeffry D. Madura," was held August 21 in Boston, site of the ACS meeting. It highlighted recent advancements in computational chemistry and featured speakers whose research interests aligned closely with Madura's work.

Duquesne was selected by ACS to host the meeting's Fall 2018 Graduate Student Symposium. Led by graduate students Sean Fischer and Kendy Pellegrene, the 11 students organized the symposium, invited speakers and raised nearly $32,000 to support the event. Nearly 80 people attended the symposium.

A chemistry and biochemistry professor in Duquesne's Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Madura joined Duquesne in 1998 and served as chemistry and biochemistry chair from 2000-2010. Well known among students and colleagues, he received various academic honors and raised more than $10 million in external research funding during his career.

He investigated computational chemistry and biophysics models, designing molecules that will physically and chemically fit where they are needed to interrupt signals for pain and other conditions associated with addiction, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Madura died last year at age 59.

Duquesne University

Founded in 1878, Duquesne is consistently ranked among the nation's top Catholic universities for its award-winning faculty and tradition of academic excellence. Duquesne, a campus of nearly 9,500 graduate and undergraduate students, has been nationally recognized for its academic programs, community service and commitment to sustainability. Follow Duquesne University on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
www.duq.edu